Veterans Bio-Medical Research Institute

Kevin Beck, PhD

kevin_beck

Chief of Staff of Research

Academic Title and School Affiliation:

Associate Professor of Neurology & Neuroscience, Rutgers – New Jersey Medical School

Education:

  • BA La Salle University
  • MA Teachers College, Columbia University
  • PhD Graduate School and University Center of the City University of New York

Areas of Research Interest:

Stress-related mental disorders, sex differences in psychopathology, neural processes associated with neuroplasticity, learning and memory, neurotransmission, psychoimmunology

Personal Statement:

Many of the difficult problems facing our veterans are unique to their experiences and highly influenced by their sociobiological backgrounds. High rates of unexplained illness and psychological disorders exemplify this fact. As a result, our laboratory has focused on delineating biopsychological factors that increase the risk for developing conditions such as Gulf War Illness, post-traumatic stress disorder, anxiety disorders, substance abuse disorders, and depression. Discovering the unique neural and psychological pathways that confer risk for these disorders will provide critical knowledge for creating more efficient, individualized treatments for these conditions. A similar philosophy is employed for identifying sex differences in these psychophysiological disorders and conducting research to determine whether sex-specific interventions can be developed for these conditions.

Memberships:

  • Society for Neuroscience
  • Organization for the Study of Sex Differences (OSSD)
  • Pavlovian Society
  • Society for Behavioral Neuroendocrinology

Select Publications:

  1. Catuzzi, J.E. & Beck, K.D.; Anxiety vulnerability in women: A two-hit hypothesis; Experimental Neurology, Epub ahead of print, doi: 10.1016/expneurol.2014.01.023, 2014.
  2. Perrotti, L.I., Dennis, T.S., Jiao, X., Servatius, R.J., Pang, K.C.H., & Beck, K.D.; Activation of extracellular signal-related kinase (ERK) and ΔFosB in emotion-associated neural circuitry after asymptotic levels of active avoidance are attained; Brain Research Bulletin, 98C, 102-110, 2013.
  3. Beck, K.D. & Catuzzi, J.E.; Understanding the causes of reduced startle reactivity in stress-related mental disorders; In: New Insights into Anxiety Disorders; F. Durbano ed. InTech (open access): Rijeka, Croatia. 135-169, 2013.
  4. Beck, K.D., Wasserman, M.C., Furst, S.J., Pang, K.C.H., & Servatius, R.J.; Differential effects of progesterone and medroxyprogesterone on delay eyeblink conditioning in ovariectomized rats; Neurobiology of Learning & Memory, 97, 148-155, 2012.
  5. Beck, K.D., Jiao, X., Ricart, T.M., Myers, C.E., Minor, T.R., Pang, K.C.H., & Servatius, R.J.; Vulnerability factors in anxiety: Strain and sex differences in the use of signals associated with non-threat during the acquisition and extinction of active-avoidance behavior; Progress in Neuro-Psychopharmacology & Biological Psychiatry, 35, 1659-1670, 2011.
  6. Beck, K.D., McLaughlin, J., Bergen, M.T., Cominski, T.P., Moldow, R.L., & Servatius, R.J.; Facilitated acquisition of the classically conditioned eyeblink response in women taking oral contraceptives; Behavioural Pharmacology, 19, 821-828, 2008.
  7. Beck, K.D. & Servatius, R.J.; Stress-induced reductions of sensory reactivity in female rats depend on ovarian hormones and the application of a painful stressor; Hormones and Behavior, 47, 532-539, 2005.
  8. Servatius, R.J. & Beck, K.D; Mild interoceptive stressors affect learning and reactivity to contextual cues: Toward understanding the development of unexplained illnesses; Neuropsychopharmacology, 30, 1483-1491, 2005.

Awards and Recognitions:

Elected Councilor and Treasurer of the OSSD (2007-2012); OSSD 2013 Annual Meeting Organizer and Program Chair; Elected to Pavlovian Society Executive Committee (2012-2015); Member of the National Institute of Justice Community Acceptance Panel on Riot Control Agents (2007); Member of the NASA Decadal Review Working Group Panel: Reproduction and Space (2013); Guest editor, Experimental Neurology Special Issue: Sex and Neurological Disease (2014)

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Allen J. Blaivas, MD

allen_blaivas

Medical Director, Sleep Services;
Pulmonary, Critical Care, Sleep Medicine Physician

Academic Title and School Affiliation:

Clinical Assistant Professor of Medicine, New Jersey Medical School, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey

Education:

  • Fellow, Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey – NJMS, Newark, New Jersey (July 2002 – June 2005)
  • Chief Resident, Department of Medicine, University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey – NJMS, Affiliated Program at Hackensack University Medical Center, Hackensack, New Jersey (July 2001 – June 2002)
  • Resident, Department of Medicine, University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey- NJMS, Newark, New Jersey (July 1999 – June 2002)
  • Doctor of Osteopathy, New York College of Osteopathic Medicine, Old Westbury, New York, (1999)
  • B.Sc. Accounting, Magna Cum Laude, CUNY Brooklyn, Brooklyn, New York, (May 1994)

Areas of Research Interest:

Excessive daytime sleepiness and insomnia in sleep apnea
Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD)

Memberships:

Fellow, College of Chest Physicians
Member, American Thoracic Society

Select Publications:

  1. Blaivas AJ, Uddin F. Obstructive sleep apnea caused by substernal goiter presenting as nonarteritic ischemic optic neuropathy. Sleep and Breathing, 2012. In Press, [Epub ahead of print; PMID 22899396].
  2. Blaivas AJ. Review: Preoperative staging using PET-CT reduced futile thoracotomies more than conventional staging in non-small cell lung cancer [Comment]. ACP Journal Club, 2009; 151 (5): JC5-8.
  3. Blaivas AJ. Review: Graduated compression stockings did not prevent deep venous thrombosis after stroke and increased skin complications [Comment]. ACP Journal Club, 2009; 151(4):JC4-9.
  4. Blaivas AJ, Strauss W. Middle Lobe Syndrome in the Left Lower Lobe in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease? Two Unusual Causes of the Middle Lobe Syndrome. Primary Care Respiratory Journal, 2009; 18(4): 331-333.
  5. Blaivas AJ. Sleep Apnea and Hypertension: The Importance of Choosing the Right Dip, American Journal of Kidney Disease 2008; 51 (6): 1069.
  6. Blaivas AJ, Yudd M, Strauss W. Subglottic Stenosis as a Consequence of Wegener’s Granulomatosis. Primary Care Respiratory Journal, 2008; 17(2): 114-116.
  7. Blaivas AJ, Patel R, Hom D, Asthyani H. Quantifying Microsleep to Assess Sleepiness. Sleep Medicine 2007; 8(2):156-159.
  8. Blaivas AJ. Review: Oral appliances are better than control appliances, but not CPAP in the obstructive sleep apnea– hypopnea syndrome [Comment]. ACP Journal Club 2006; 145(2):43.
  9. Blaivas AJ, Lardizabal, McDonald R. Two Unusual Sequelae of Tuberculous Meningitis. Southern Medical Journal 2005; 98(10): 1028-30.
  10. Blaivas AJ. Case and Comment: A Dangerous Mix. Patient Care 2004; 38(9): 75-6.
  11. Gejerman G, Mullokandov EA, Bagiella E, Blaivas AJ, Beitler JJ. Endobronchial Brachytherapy and External Beam Radiotherapy in Patients with Endobronchial Obstruction and Extrabronchial Extension. Brachytherapy 2002; 1(4): 204-210.
  12. Blaivas AJ. May a Doctor Refuse To See Patients? The Journal of Halacha and Contemporary Society, Fall 1999; No. 38: 100-116.2014)

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Victor T. Chang, MD, FACP

Hematology/Oncology,
Medical Service

Academic Title and School Affiliation:

Professor of Medicine, Rutgers University/New Jersey Medical School

Education:

  • Massachusetts Institute of Technology, SB/SM, (1979)
  • New York University School of Medicine, M.D., (1983)
  • Intern, Department of Medicine, The Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, Maryland, (1983-84)
  • Research Associate, The Howard Hughes Medical Institute, (1984-85)
  • Clinical Fellow in Medicine/Medical Genetics, The Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, Maryland, (1984-85)
  • Resident, Department of Medicine, The Good Samaritan Hospital of Maryland, Baltimore, Maryland. (1985-87)
  • Chief Resident, Department of Medicine, The Good Samaritan Hospital of Maryland, Baltimore, Maryland, (1987-88)
  • Fellow, Division of Hematology/Oncology, Cornell University Medical College, New York, New York, (1988-1991)
  • Fellow, Division of Clinical Pharmacology, Cornell University Medical College, New York, New York, (1991-92)
  • Fellow, Pain Service, Department of Neurology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York, (1992-93)

Areas of Research Interest

  • Symptom Control
  • Palliative Medicine
  • Hematology

Memberships:

  • Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group
  • Palliative Care Research Consortium
  • American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • American Society of Hematology
  • Chinese American Medical Society
  • American Medical Association
  • American College of Physicians, Fellow
  • American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine

Awards and Recognitions:

  • Project Death in America Faculty Scholar, (2000-2002)
  • Co-Chair, ECOG Symptom Management Committee
  • Research Excellence in Trials Award by the National Cancer Institute

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Suzie Chen, PhD

suzie_chenPhysiologist

Academic Title and School Affiliation:

Professor, Rutgers University

Education:

PhD, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY

Areas of Research Interest:

  • Melanoma development using genetic engineered mouse models

Memberships:

  • AAAS
  • AACR
  • Society of Toxicology
  • Society of Melanoma Research
  • PanAmerican Society of Pigment Cell Research

Select Publications:

  1. Pollock, P.M., Cohen-Solal, K.A., Sood, R., Namkoong, J., Martino, J.J., Koganti, A., Zhu, H., Robbins, C., Makalowska, I., Shin, S.S., Marin, Y., Roberts, K.G., Yudt, L.M., Chen, A., Cheng, J., Incao, A., Pinkett, H.W., Graham, C.L., Dunn, K., Crespo-Carbone, S.M., Mackason, K.R., Ryan, K.B., Sinsimer, D., Goydos, J., Reuhl, K.R., Eckhaus, M., Meltzer, P.S., Pavan, W.J., Trent, J.M. and Chen, S. (2003) Melanoma mouse model implicates metabotropic glutamate signaling in melanocytic neoplasia. Nat Genet. 38:108-112. PMID 12704387
  2. Namkoong, J., Shin, S.S., Lee, H.J., Marín, Y.E., Wall, B.A. Goydos, J.S. and Chen, S. (2007) Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor 1 (GRM1) and Glutamate Signaling in Human Melanoma. Cancer Res. 67:2298-2305. PMID 17332361
  3. Yip, D., Le, M., Chan, J., Lee, J., Mehnert, J., Yudd, A., Kempf, J., Shih, W., Chen, S. and Goydos, J. (2009) A phase 0 trial of Riluzole in patients with resectable stage III and IV melanoma. Clin. Can. Res. 15: 3896-3902. PMCID: PMC2812866
  4. Martino, J. J., Wall, B. A., Mastrantoni, E., Wilimczyk, B., La Cava, S., Degenhardt, K., White, E. and Chen, S. (2013) Metabotropic glutamate receptor 1 (Grm1) is an oncogene in epithelial cells. Oncogene 32: 4366-4376.
  5. Wen Y, Li J, Koo J, Shin S-S, Lin Y, Jeong B-S, Cohen-Solal K , Mehnert J. M, Chen S. and Goydos J. S. (2014) Metabotropic glutamate receptor 1 activation leads to downstream pro-angiogenic signaling and enhanced angiogenesis in melanoma. Cancer Res. 74: 2499-2509. pMID:2449180
  6. Wall, B., Wangari-Talbot, J., Shin, S., Schiff, D., Sierra, J., Yu, L. J., Khan, A., Haffty, B., Goydos, J. and Chen, S. (2014) Disruption of GRM1-mediated signaling using riluzole results I DNA damage in melanoma cells. Pigment Cell Melanoma Res. 27: 263-274. PMC3947419
  7. Teh, J., Shah, R., La Cava, S., Dolfi, S., Mehta, M., Kongara, S., Price, S., Ganesan, S., Reuhl, K., Hirshfield, K., Karantza, V. and Chen, S. (2015). Metabotropic glutamate receptor 1 disrupts mammary acinar architecture and initiates malignant transformation of mammary epithelial cells. Breast Cancer Research and Treatment. 151:57-73. PMID: 25859923
  8. Kulkarni, A., Al-Hraishaw, H., Hirshfield, K., Chen, S., Pine, S., Jeyamohan, C., Sokol, L., Slrai, A., Lung, T., White, E., Rodriguez, L., Mehnert, J. and Ganesan, S. (2017) BRAF fusion as a novel mechanism of acquired resistance to vemurafenib in BRAFV600E mutant melanoma. Clin. Can. Res. 23:5631-5638.
  9. Isola, A., Eddy, K., Zembrzuski, K., Goydos, J. and Chen, S. (2017) Oncotarget 9: 1187-1199. PMCID: PMC5787429
  10. Mehner, J., Silk, A., Wen, Y., Lee, J., Dudek, L., Jeong, B., Li, J., Schenkel, J., Sadimin, E., Kane, M., Lin, H., Shih, W., Zloza, A., Chen, S. and Goydos, J. (2018) A phase II trial of riluzole, an antagonist of metabotropic glutamate receptor 1 (GRM1) signaling, in patients with advanced melanoma.Pig. Cell Mel. Res. 31: 534-540.

Awards:

  • Rutgers University Board of Trustees Award for Excellence in Research, Piscataway, NJ (2005)
  • Keynote Speaker at Brain Tumor Center Seminar Series MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston TX (2005)
  • Second International Melanoma Congress Best Abstract Award, New York, NY (2007)
  • Invited Speaker at Keystone Symposium on GPCR and Cancer (2015)
  • Invited Speaker at 4th GPCR in Drug Discovery (2016)
  • Invited Speaker at 5th-9th International Meetings on Metabotropic Glutamate Receptors (2005, 2008, 2011, 2014, 2017)

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Yun-Beom Choi, MD-PhD

yun-beom_choi

Staff Neurologist/Neurology Service

Academic Title and School Affiliation:

  • Clinical Assistant Professor, Department of Neurology, Rutgers, New Jersey Medical School

Education:

  • AB, Harvard College
  • MD-PhD, Harvard Medical School

Personal Statement:

As an expert in synaptic plasticity, I am bringing a new dimension to the existing research strength in neuroimmunology in the Neurology Service at VA New Jersey Health Care System. My research focuses on novel therapeutic approaches for Alzheimer’s disease and related dementia using animal models.

Areas of Research Interest:

  • Dementia

Memberships:

  • Society for Neuroscience
  • American Academy of Neurology

Select Publications:

  1. Kim J, Jung S-Y, Lee YK, Park S, Choi J-S, Lee CJ, Kim H-S, Choi Y-B, Scheiffele P, Bailey CH, Kandel ER, Kim J-H. Neuroligin-1 is required for normal expression of LTP and associative fear memory in the amygdala of adult animals. Proceedings of National Academy of Sciences USA 105:9087-9092. (2008)
    Puthanveettil SV, Monje FJ, Miniaci MC, Choi Y-B, Karl KA, Khandros E, Gawinowicz MA, Sheetz MP, Kandel ER. A new component in long-term synaptic plasticity: Upregulation of kinesin in the neurons of gill-withdrawal reflex. Cell 135:960-073. (2008)
  2. Si K, Choi Y-B, White-Grindley E, Majumdar A, Kandel ER. Aplysia CPEB can form prion-like multimers in sensory neurons that contribute to long-term facilitation. Cell 140:421-435. (2010)
  3. Jung S-Y, Kim J, Kwon OB, Jung JH, An K, Jeong AY, Lee CJ, Choi Y-B, Bailey CH, Kandel ER, Kim J-H. Input-specific synaptic plasticity in the amygdala is regulated by neuroligin-1 via postsynaptic NMDA receptors. Proceedings of National Academy of Sciences USA 107:4710-4715. (2010)
  4. Till SM, Li HL, Miniaci MC, Kandel ER, Choi Y-B. A presynaptic role for FMRP during protein synthesis-dependent long-term plasticity in Aplysia. Learning and Memory 18:39-48. (2011)
  5. Choi Y-B, Li H-L, Kassabov SR, Jin I, Puthenveettil SV, Karl KA, Lu Y, Kim J-H, Bailey CH, Kandel ER. Neurexin-neuroligin trans-synaptic interaction mediates learning-related synaptic remodeling and long-term facilitation in Aplysia. Neuron 70:468-481. (2011)
  6. Kassabov SR, Choi Y-B, Karl KA, Vishwasrao HD, Bailey CH, Kandel ER. A single Aplysia neurotrophin mediated synaptic facilitation via differentially processed isoforms secreted as mature or precursor forms. Cell Reports 3:1213-1227. (2013)
  7. Puthanveettil, SV, Antonov I, Kalchikov S, Rajasethupathy P, Yu F, Choi Y-B, Kohn AB, Citarella M, Yu F, Karl KA, Kinet M, Morozova I, Russo JJ, Ju J, Moroz LL, Kandel ER. A new strategy to capture and characterize the synaptic transcriptome Proceedings of National Academy of Sciences USA 110:7464-7469. (2013)
  8. Choi Y-B, Kadakkuzha BM, Liu XA, Akhmedov K, Kandel ER, Puthanveettil SV. Huntingtin is critical both pre- and postsynaptically for long-term learning-related synaptic plasticity in Aplysia. PLoS One 9(7): e103004. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0103004. (2014)
  9. Kwon OB, Lee JH, Kim HJ, Lee S, Lee S, Jeong MJ, Kim SJ, Jo HJ, Ko B, Chang S, Park SK, Choi Y-B, Bailey CH, Kandel ER, Kim J-H. Dopamine Regulation of Amygdala Inhibitory Circuits for Expression of Learned Fear. Neuron 88:378-389. (2015)
  10. Yang YR, Jung JH, Kim S-J, Hamada K, Suzuki A, Kim HJ, Lee JH, Kwon O-B, Yeon Lee YK, Kim J, Kim E-K, Jang H-J, Kang D-S, Choi J-S, C. Lee J, Marshall J, Koh H-Y, Kim C-J, Seok H, Kim SH, Choi, JH Choi Y-B, Cocco L, Ryu SH, Kim J-H, Suh PG. Forebrain-specific ablation of phospholipase Cγ1 causes manic-like behavior. Molecular Psychiatry 22:1473-1482. (2017)
  11. Kim S-J, Jeong M-J, Jo H-J, Jung, JH, Kaang B-K, Choi Y-B, Kim J-H. Identification of postsynaptic phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2) roles for synaptic plasticity using chemically induced dimerization. Scientific Reports 7:3351. (2017)

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Bruce A. Citron, PhD

bruce_citron

Director, Laboratory of Molecular Biology, Research Service

Academic Title and School Affiliation:

  • Professor of Molecular Medicine, University of South Florida- Morsani College of Medicine (current)
  • Professor of Pharmacology, Physiology, & Neuroscience, Rutgers- New Jersey Medical School (switch to this on 11-30-18)

Education:

  • BA, Colgate University, Departments of Chemistry and Biology
  • PhD, University of Iowa, Genetics Program
  • Postdoctoral Fellowship, The Rockefeller University, Molecular Cell Biology

Areas of Research Interest:

  • Neuroprotection
  • Traumatic Brain Injury
  • Gulf War Illnesses
  • Alzheimer’s Disease
  • ALS

Personal Statement:

The pursuit of effective treatment strategies for neurodegenerative disorders afflicting Veterans has been my main focus for many years. Neurons are particularly sensitive to insults and we have identified underlying mechanisms responsible for this unusual susceptibility in human samples and model systems. Neuron loss involves a complex interaction between different cell types present in the brain and spinal cord. Through discovery of regulatory mechanisms important to the health of neurons, we have identified factors that are targeted in our development of therapeutic strategies to combat neurodegeneration.

Memberships:

  • American Aging Association
  • American Association for the Advancement of Science
  • American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
  • American Society for Neural Therapy and Repair
  • Genetics Society of America
  • International Society to Advance Alzheimer’s Research and Treatment
  • National Neurotrauma Society, and the
  • Society for Neuroscience

Select Publications:

  1. Ratliff, W.A., Saykally, J. N., Kane, M. J., and Citron, B. A., Neuromuscular junction morphology & gene dysregulation in the wobbler model of spinal neurodegeneration. J. Mol. Neurosci. 66:114-20 (2018).
  2. Saykally, J. N., Ratliff, W. A., Keeley, K. L., Pick, C. G., Mervis, R. F., and Citron, B. A., Repetitive mild closed head injury alters protein expression and dendritic complexity in a mouse model. J. Neurotrauma 35:139-48 (2018).
  3. Saykally, J. N., Hatic, H., Keeley, K. L., Jain, S. C., Ravindranath, V. R., and Citron, B. A., Withania somnifera extract protects model neurons from in vitro traumatic injury. Cell Transplant. 26:1193-201 (2017).
  4. Citron, B.A., Saykally, J.N., Cao, C., Dennis, J.S., Runfeldt, M., Arendash, G.W. Transcription factor Sp1 inhibition, memory, and cytokines in a mouse model of Alzheimer’s disease. Am. J. Neurodegener. Dis. 4:40-8 (2015).
  5. Saykally, J.N., Rachmany, L., Hatic, H., Shaer, A., Rubovitch, V., Pick, C.G., and Citron, B.A. The Nrf2 Activator, tert-Butylhydroquinone (tBHQ), Improves Cognitive Performance in Mice after Mild Traumatic Brain Injury. Neuroscience 223:305-14 (2012).
  6. Kane, M.J. and Citron, B.A. Transcription Factors as Therapeutic Targets in CNS Disorders. Recent Pat. CNS Drug Discov. 4:190-9 (2009).
  7. Dennis, J. S. and Citron, B. A., Wobbler mice modeling motor neuron disease display elevated Transactive Response DNA binding protein. Neuroscience 158:745-50 (2009).
  8. Citron, B. A., Arnold, P.M., Haynes, N.G., Ameenuddin, S., Farooque, M., SantaCruz, K., and Festoff, B.W., Neuroprotective effects of caspase-3 inhibition on functional recovery and tissue sparing following acute spinal cord injury. Spine 33:2269-77 (2008).
  9. Festoff, B. W., Ameenuddin, S., Arnold, P. M., Wong, A. A., SantaCruz, K. S., and Citron, B. A., Minocycline neuroprotects, reduces microgliosis, and inhibits caspase protease expression early after spinal cord injury. J. Neurochem. 97:1314-26 (2006).
  10. Citron, B. A., SantaCruz, K., Davies, P. J. A., and Festoff, B. W., Intron-exon swapping of transglutaminase mRNA and neuronal tau aggregation in Alzheimer’s disease. J. Biol. Chem. 276:3295-301 (2001).
  11. Citron, B.A., Smirnova, I.V., Arnold, P.M., and Festoff, B.W., Upregulation of neurotoxic serine proteases, prothrombin and protease-activated receptor 1 early after spinal cord injury. J. Neurotrauma 17:1191-204, (2000).
  12. Citron, B. A., Kaufman, S., Milstien, S., Naylor, E. W., Greene, C. L., and Davis, M., Mutation in the 4a-carbinolamine dehydratase gene leads to mild hyperphenylalaninemia with defective cofactor metabolism. Amer. J. Hum. Genet. 53:768-774 (1993).
  13. Citron, B. A., Falck-Pedersen, E., Salditt-Georgieff, M., and Darnell, J. E. , Transcriptional termination occurs within a 1000 base pair region downstream from the poly(A) site of the mouse b-globin (major) gene. Nucl. Acids Res. 12:8723-8731 (1984).
  14. Citron, B. A., Feiss, M., and Donelson, J. E., Expression of the yeast galactokinase gene in Escherichia coli. Gene 6:251-264 (July 1979).

Awards and Recognitions

  • Editorial board of the American Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease and Other Dementias
  • Associate Editor, BMC Neuroscience- section on Neurobiology of Disease

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Monica L. Clement, PhD

monica_clement

Neuropsychologist/SCI/D

Academic Title and School Affiliation:

Clinical Assistant Professor, Rutgers the State University of New Jersey New Jersey Medical School, Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation

Education:

  • PhD, Clinical Psychology, The Ohio State University, 2005
  • BS, Psychology, Summa Cum Laude, Stony Brook University, 1999

Areas of Research Interest:

  • Adjustment to chronic illness and disease
  • Mental health of racial/ethnic minorities

Personal Statement:

Dr. Clement is a licensed psychologist and practices clinical psychology and clinical neuropsychology. She obtained a bachelor’s degree summa cum laude in psychology from Stony Brook University in 1999, where she was an NIH Minority Access to Research Careers (MARC) Fellow and NSF Women in Science and Engineering (WISE) Scholar. She obtained a doctorate in psychology from The Ohio State University in 2005, where she was an American Psychological Association Minority Fellowship Program (APA/MFP) Fellow. She completed an APA accredited psychology internship at the Northport Veterans Affairs Medical Center followed by a two-year post-doctoral fellowship in pediatric and adult clinical neuropsychology in a private practice affiliated with the Rutgers New Jersey Medical School.

She currently serve as the Rehabilitation Neuropsychologist for the Department of Veterans Affairs New Jersey Health Care System (NJHCS) Spinal Cord Injury and Disorders Center. She is a Clinical Assistant Professor in the Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation at Rutgers, New Jersey Medical School, a guest editor for the Journal of Head Trauma Rehabilitation and actively mentors and trains students in various health care fields. She is a member of the American Psychological Association, including the Society for Clinical Neuropsychology, the Association of VA Psychology Leaders and a lifetime member of the Association of Black Psychologists.

As a practicing psychologist, she sees clinical care informed by evidence based practices as an essential component of optimal health care delivery. Relatedly, she also believes that research informed by real life clinical problems is of great benefit to all. Throughout her career she has participated in the execution and utilization of research as part of her work. This includes her work in the field of rehabilitation, which began over 16 years ago. Present day, she collaborates with the SCI/D Center interdisciplinary team to identify ways to enhance care via novel and impactful research.

Memberships:

  • American Psychological Association
  • Society for Clinical Neuropsychology
  • Association of VA Psychology Leaders
  • Association of Black Psychologists

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Joseph Conerty, PsyD

joseph_conerty

Staff Psychologist/PTSD Clinical Team

Education:

  • Rutgers University, 2013, Doctor of Psychology (Clinical)

Areas of Research Interest:

  • Phenomenology of Schizophrenia
  • Treatment of Psychological Trauma

Memberships:

  • American Psychological Association – Member
  • Division 12 (Clinical Psychology) – Member
  • Division 18 (Public Service) – Affiliate
  • Association of VA Psychology Leaders – Affiliate

Select Publication:

Conerty J, Skodlar B, Pienkos E, Zadravek T, Byrom G, Sass L: Examination of Anomalous World Experience: A report on reliability. Psychopathology 2017;50:55-59.

Award:

Scholarship – National Register of Health Service Psychologists (2017)

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Vedad Delic, PhD

vedad_delic

Research Scientist, Research and Development

Academic Title and School Affiliation:

  • Assistant Professor, Department of Pharmacology & Physiology, Rutgers Biomedical and Health Sciences – Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences; Newark, New Jersey
  • Assistant Professor, Department of Physical Medicine &Rehabilitation, Rutgers Biomedical and Health Sciences – New Jersey Medical School; Newark, New Jersey

Education:

  • University of South Florida Morsani College of Medicine, Molecular Medicine M.S. (2011)
  • University of South Florida, CMMB Department, Cell and Molecular Biology Ph.D. (2015)
  • University of Alabama at Birmingham, Neurology Department, Postdoctoral Fellowship (2018)

Areas of Research Interest:

  • Mechanisms of Traumatic Brian Injury
  • Parkinson’s Disease
  • Neurodegeneration

Personal Statement:

Mild and repetitive traumatic brain injury (r-mTBI) predisposes the brain to neurodegenerative diseases, such as Parkinson’s Disease (PD). Due to our incomplete understanding of the r-mTBI and PD disease pathology, treatments remain only palliative. To better treat and to prevent PD, which is unfortunately over represented in the Veteran population we aim to understand the mechanisms of r-mTBI that cause PD later in life. We will employ the most advanced pre-clinical models of r-mTBI and PD to help develop treatments and preventative strategies for our Veterans.

Memberships:

  • 2015: The American Society for Neural Therapy and Repair (ASNTR)
  • 2015: Advisory Council for Charles Claybaker D.U.S.T.O.F.F Foundation
  • 2015: University of Alabama Postdoctoral Association
  • 2017: Society for Neuroscience (SFN)

Select Publications:

  1. Delic V, Noble K, Zivkovic S, Phan TA, Reynes C, Zhang Y, Phillips O, Claybaker C, Ta Y, Dinh VB, Cruz J, Prolla TA, Bradshaw PC. The effects of AICAR and rapamycin on mitochondrial function in immortalized mitochondrial DNA mutator murine embryonic fibroblasts. Biol Open. 2018 Sep 3. pii: bio.033852. doi:10.1242/bio.033852. [Epub ahead of print] PubMed PMID: 30177551.
  2. Delic V, Chandra S, Abdelmotilib H, Maltbie T, Wang S, Kem D, Scott HJ, Underwood RN, Liu Z, Volpicelli-Daley LA, West AB. Sensitivity and specificity of phospho-Ser129 α-synuclein monoclonal antibodies. J Comp Neurol. 2018 Aug 15;526(12):1978-1990. doi: 10.1002/cne.24468. PubMed PMID: 29888794; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC6031478.
  3. Delic V, Kurien C, Cruz J, Zivkovic S, Barretta J, Thomson A, Hennessey D, Joseph J, Ehrhart J, Willing AE, Bradshaw P, Garbuzova-Davis S. Discrete mitochondrial aberrations in the spinal cord of sporadic ALS patients. J Neurosci Res. 2018 Aug;96(8):1353-1366. doi: 10.1002/jnr.24249. Epub 2018 May 6. PubMed PMID: 29732581.
  4. Harms AS, Delic V, Thome AD, Bryant N, Liu Z, Chandra S, Jurkuvenaite A, West AB. α-Synuclein fibrils recruit peripheral immune cells in the rat brain prior to neurodegeneration. Acta Neuropathol Commun. 2017 Nov 21;5(1):85. doi:10.1186/s40478-017-0494-9. PubMed PMID: 29162163; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC5698965.
  5. Zhao HT, John N, Delic V, Ikeda-Lee K, Kim A, Weihofen A, Swayze EE, Kordasiewicz HB, West AB, Volpicelli-Daley LA. LRRK2 Antisense Oligonucleotides Ameliorate α-Synuclein Inclusion Formation in a Parkinson’s Disease Mouse Model. Mol Ther Nucleic Acids. 2017 Sep 15;8:508-519. doi: 10.1016/j.omtn.2017.08.002. Epub 2017 Aug 10. PubMed PMID: 28918051; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC5573879.
  6. Abdelmotilib H, Maltbie T, Delic V, Liu Z, Hu X, Fraser KB, Moehle MS, Stoyka L, Anabtawi N, Krendelchtchikova V, Volpicelli-Daley LA, West A. α-Synuclein fibril-induced inclusion spread in rats and mice correlates with dopaminergic Neurodegeneration. Neurobiol Dis. 2017 Sep;105:84-98. doi:10.1016/j.nbd.2017.05.014. Epub 2017 May 30. PubMed PMID: 28576704; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC5701756.
  7. Delic V, Griffin JWD, Zivkovic S, Zhang Y, Phan TA, Gong H, Chaput D, Reynes C, Dinh VB, Cruz J, Cvitkovic E, Placides D, Frederic E, Mirzaei H, Stevens SM Jr, Jinwal U, Lee DC, Bradshaw PC. Individual Amino Acid Supplementation Can Improve Energy Metabolism and Decrease ROS Production in Neuronal Cells Overexpressing Alpha-Synuclein. Neuromolecular Med. 2017 Sep;19(2-3):322-344. doi: 10.1007/s12017-017-8448-8. Epub 2017 Jun 15. PubMed PMID: 28620826.
  8. Sawmiller D, Li S, Mori T, Habib A, Rongo D, Delic V, Bradshaw PC, Shytle RD, Sanberg C, Bickford P, Tan J. Beneficial effects of a pyrroloquinolinequinone-containing dietary formulation on motor deficiency, cognitive decline and mitochondrial dysfunction in a mouse model of Alzheimer’s disease. Heliyon. 2017 Apr 4;3(4):e00279. doi: 10.1016/j.heliyon.2017.e00279. eCollection 2017 Apr. PubMed PMID: 28413833; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC5384415.
  9. Delic V, Brownlow M, Joly-Amado A, Zivkovic S, Noble K, Phan TA, Ta Y, Zhang Y, Bell SD, Kurien C, Reynes C, Morgan D, Bradshaw PC. Calorie restriction does not restore brain mitochondrial function in P301L tau mice, but it does decrease mitochondrial F0F1-ATPase activity. Mol Cell Neurosci. 2015 Jul;67:46-54. doi:10.1016/j.mcn.2015.06.001. Epub 2015 Jun 3. PubMed PMID: 26048366.
  10. Dragicevic N, Delic V, Cao C, Copes N, Lin X, Mamcarz M, Wang L, Arendash GW, Bradshaw PC. Caffeine increases mitochondrial function and blocks melatonin signaling to mitochondria in Alzheimer’s mice and cells. Neuropharmacology. 2012 Dec;63(8):1368-79. doi: 10.1016/j.neuropharm.2012.08.018. Epub 2012 Sep 1. PubMed PMID: 22959965.
  11. Kane MJ, Hatic H, Delic V, Dennis JS, Butler CL, Saykally JN, Citron BA. Modeling the pathobiology of repetitive traumatic brain injury in immortalized neuronal cell lines. Brain Res. 2011 Nov 24;1425:123-31. doi: 10.1016/j.brainres.2011.09.047. Epub 2011 Sep 29. PubMed PMID: 22018688.
  12. Dragicevic N, Smith A, Lin X, Yuan F, Copes N, Delic V, Tan J, Cao C, Shytle RD, Bradshaw PC. Green tea epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) and other flavonoids reduce Alzheimer’s amyloid-induced mitochondrial dysfunction. J Alzheimers Dis. 2011;26(3):507-21. doi: 10.3233/JAD-2011-101629. PubMed PMID: 21694462.

Awards:

  • 2012: Fred L & Helen M Tharp stipend. Fred L & Helen M Tharp endowment
  • 2012: Certificate of Appreciation for research and mentorship: United States Army 3rd Ranger Battalion
  • 2014: Outstanding CMMB T.A. Award University of South Florida CMMB Dept.
  • 2015: Travel award Society for Neural Therapy and Repair

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Michael J. Falvo, PhD

michael_falvo

Health Sciences Specialist,
War Related Illness and Injury Study Center (WRIISC)

Academic Title and School Affiliation:

  • Assistant Professor, Department of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation, Rutgers Biomedical and Health Sciences – New Jersey Medical School; Newark, New Jersey
  • Assistant Professor, Department of Pharmacology & Physiology, Rutgers Biomedical and Health Sciences – Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences; Newark, New Jersey

Education:

  • The College of New Jersey, B.S. in Exercise Science, Ewing, New Jersey, (2004)
  • University of Memphis, M.S. in Kinesiology, Memphis, Tennessee, (2006)
  • Washington University in St. Louis, Ph.D. in Kinesiology, St. Louis, Missouri, (2010)
  • VA New Jersey Health Care System, Postdoctoral Fellowship in Integrative Physiology, East Orange, New Jersey, (2010 – 2012)

Areas of Research Interest:

  • Dyspnea
  • Exercise Intolerance
  • Clinical Exercise Physiology
  • Cardiopulmonary Function and Assessment
  • Environmental and Occupational Exposure

Memberships:

  • American Thoracic Society
  • American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM)
  • ACSM Clinical Exercise Physiology Association

Select Publications:

  1. Salcedo PA, Lindheimer JB, Klein-Adams JC, Sotolongo AM, Falvo MJ. Effects of Exercise Training on Pulmonary Function in Adults With Chronic Lung Disease: A Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials. Arch Phys Med Rehabil. 2018 Apr 17. pii: S0003-9993(18)30223-5. doi: 10.1016/j.apmr.2018.03.014. Review. PubMed PMID: 29678450.
  2. Chen Y, Meyer JN, Hill HZ, Lange G, Condon MR, Klein JC, Ndirangu D, Falvo MJ. Role of mitochondrial DNA damage and dysfunction in veterans with Gulf War Illness. PLoS One. 2017 Sep 14;12(9):e0184832. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0184832. eCollection 2017. Erratum in: PLoS One. 2017 Oct 16;12 (10 ):e0186711. PubMed PMID: 28910366; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC5599026.
  3. Falvo MJ, Helmer DA, Klein JC, Osinubi OY, Ndirangu D, Patrick-DeLuca LA, Sotolongo AM. Isolated diffusing capacity reduction is a common clinical presentation in deployed Iraq and Afghanistan veterans with deployment-related environmental exposures. Clin Respir J. 2018 Feb;12(2):795-798. doi: 10.1111/crj.12552. Epub 2016 Sep 27. PubMed PMID: 27614096.
  4. Falvo MJ, Lindheimer JB, Serrador JM. Dynamic cerebral autoregulation is impaired in Veterans with Gulf War Illness: A case-control study. PLoS One. 2018 Oct 15;13(10):e0205393. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0205393. eCollection 2018. PubMed PMID: 30321200.
  5. Falvo MJ, Abraham JH, Osinubi OY, Klein JC, Sotolongo AM, Ndirangu D, Patrick-DeLuca LA, Helmer DA. Bronchodilator Responsiveness and Airflow Limitation Are Associated With Deployment Length in Iraq and Afghanistan Veterans. J Occup Environ Med. 2016 Apr;58(4):325-8. doi: 10.1097/JOM.0000000000000675. PubMed PMID: 27058470.
  6. Falvo MJ, Chen Y, Klein JC, Ndirangu D, Condon MR. Abnormal rheological properties of red blood cells as a potential marker of Gulf War Illness: A preliminary study. Clin Hemorheol Microcirc. 2018;68(4):361-370. doi: 10.3233/CH-170262. PubMed PMID: 29660926.

Awards:

  • Meritorious Achievement Award in Applied Muscle Physiology, University of Memphis (2006)
  • Melvin Humphrey Student Research Award, University of Memphis (2006)
  • Alumni Wall of Fame, Department of Health and Exercise Science, The College of New Jersey (2013)
  • Outstanding Alumni, Department of Health and Sport Sciences, University of Memphis (2014)

Recognitions:

American College of Sports Medicine Registered Clinical Exercise Physiologist® (RCEP®)

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Patricia Gilhooly, MD

patricia_gilhooly

Staff Urologist,
Surgical Service

Academic Title and School Affiliation:

Assistant Professor of Surgery/Urology, Rutgers New Jersey Medical School

Education:

  • AB, Manhattanville College
  • MD, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons

Areas of Research Interest:

  • Voiding Dysfunction
  • Neurogenic Bladder
  • Sexual Dysfunction
  • Prostatic Disease

Personal Statement:

During my 20 years of research at the VANJHCS, I have been the Principal Investigator of 25 clinical research trials including 3 VA Cooperative Studies. My aim has been to involve our Veterans in research that could significantly impact their and/or their fellow Veterans’ health in areas that also affect quality of life, such as incontinence and sexual functioning.

Memberships:

  • Society of Urodynamics and Female Pelvic Medicine and Urogenital Reconstruction, formerly Society of Urodynamics and Female Urology
    International Society for the Study of Women’s Sexual Health
  • Fellow, American College of Surgeons
  • American Urological Association
  • Society of Women in Urology
  • Alpha Omega Alpha, National Honor Medical Society of the USA

Select Publications:

  1. Kaplan S, Garvin D, Gilhooly P, Koppel M, Labasky R, Milsten R, Reddy P, Rosenberg S, Sussman D, White C, Lee M, Pappas F, Waldstreicher J.
  2. Impact of baseline symptom severity on future risk of benign prostatic hyperplasia-related outcomes and long-term response to finasteride. The Pless
    Study Group. Urology. 2000 Oct 1;56(4):610-6.
  3. Sheynin, J.; Shikari, S.; Gluck, M. A.; Moustafa, A. A.; Servatius, R. J. & Myers, C. E. (2013). Enhanced avoidance learning in behaviorally-inhibited young men and women. Stress, 16(3):289-299. PMID: 23101990; PMCID: PMC3767128
  4. Gilhooly, P., Ottenweller, J.,Lange, G., Tiersky, L., Natelson, B. Chronic Fatigue and Sexual Dysfunction in Female Gulf War Veterans. J.Sex and Marital Therapy , 2001, 27: 483-487.
  5. Young JM, Bennett C, Gilhooly P, Wessells H, Ramos DE. Efficacy and Safety of Sildenafil Citrate (Viagra) in Black and Hispanic American men. Urology. 2002 Sep; 60(2 Suppl 2): 39-48.
  6. Sadeghi-Nejad H, Lim H, Long K, and Gilhooly P. Assessment of Viagra Efficacy Using the Erectile Dysfunction Inventory of Treatment Satisfaction (EDITS) Urologia Internationalis; Acta Italica Urologica 71 (1): 100-102, 2003.
  7. Wilt TJ, Brawer MK, Jones KM, Barry MJ, Aronson WJ, Fox S, Gingrich JR, Wei JT, Gilhooly P, Grob BM, Nsouli I, Iyer P, Cartagena R, Snider G, Roehrborn C, Sharifi R, Blank W, Pandya P, Andriole GL, Culkin D, Wheeler T; Prostate Cancer Intervention versus Observation Trial (PIVOT) Study Group. Radical prostatectomy versus observation for localized prostate cancer. N Engl J Med. 2012 Jul 19;367(3):203-13.

Awards and Recognitions:

  • 1995: Certificate of Appreciation for meritorious service within the VA Cooperative Studies Program of the medical research service ( CSP #359)
  • 2009: Certificate of Recognition for dedication in advancing research in the prevention of prostate cancer, SELECT TRIAL, Southwest Oncology Group
  • 2011: Certificate of Recognition for advancing research in the treatment of prostate cancer, PIVOT TRIAL, VA Cooperative Studies

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Grace L. Guo, MBBS, PhD

grace_guo

Staff Urologist,
Surgical Service

Academic Title and School Affiliation:

Research Scientist/Research and Development Service, VA New Jersey Health Care System

Education:

  • 2001-2004 Post-doctoral fellow, Laboratory of Metabolism, NCI, NIH, Bethesda, MD, USA
  • 1997-2001 Ph.D., Department of Pharmacology, Toxicology and Therapeutics, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS, USA
  • 1995-1997 M.S., Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Little Rock, AR, USA
  • 1993-1995 M.P.H. program and medical resident, Occupational Medicine Hospital, West China University of Medical Sciences, Chengdu, China
  • 1987-1993 M.B.B.S (Bachelor of Medicine). West China University of Medical Sciences (now West China Medical Center of Sichuan University), Chengdu, China

Areas of Research Interest:

Our laboratory has been focusing to determine the underlying molecular mechanism(s) for the development of non-alcoholic liver diseases, alcoholic liver diseases, and liver cancer. The pathway that we have elucidated and is critical for the liver function and diseases is the intestine-liver axis composed of the bile acids-FXR-FGF19/15, which regulates bile acid homeostasis, lipid metabolism, and inflammation. The scientific finding from our laboratory has been instrumental to provide scientific basis in developing biomarkers and future treatment for these liver diseases.

Memberships:

  • American Association of the Study of Liver Diseases
  • Society of Toxicology
  • American Society of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics

Select Publications:

  1. Kong B, Sun X, Huang M, Chow MD, Zhong XB, Xie W, Lee YH, Guo GL, A novel fibroblast growth factor 15 dependent- and bile acid-independent promotion of liver regeneration in mice. 2018, Hepatology (accepted)
  2. Kong B, Zhu Y, Li G, Williams JA, Buckley K, Tawfik O, Luyendyk JP, Guo GL. Hepatic specific deletion of FXR in liver tumor formation, Am J Physiol Gastrointest Liver Physiol. 2016: 310: G295-302
  3. Shuang Q, Guo GL, Saumoy M, Honda A, Salen G, Xu G. Bile acid flux through portal but not peripheral veins inhibits CYP7A1 expression without involvement of ileal FGF19 in rabbits. Am J Physiol Gastrointest Liver Physiol. 2014 Aug 15;307(4):G479-86.
  4. Kong B, Wang L, Chiang JY, Zhang Y, Klaassen CD, Guo GL. Mechanism of tissue-specific farnesoid x receptor in suppressing the expression of genes in bile-acid synthesis in mice. Hepatology 2012.56:1034-43.
  5. Thomas A, Hart S, Kong B, Fang J, Zhong X, and Guo GL. Genome-wide tissue specific FXR binding in mouse liver and intestine. Hepatology 2010, 51:1410-9.
  6. Maran RRM, Thomas A, Roth M, Sheng Z, Esterly N, Pinson D, Gao X, Zhang Y, Ganapathy V, Gonzalez FJ, Guo GL. FXR-deficiency in mice leads to increased intestinal epithelial cell proliferation and tumor development. J Pharmacol Exp Ther. 2009, 328:469-77. (Highlighted by the journal)
  7. Kong B, Luyendyk JP, Tawfik O, Guo GL. FXR-deficiency induces non-alcoholic steatohepatitis in LDLr-knockout mice fed a high-fat diet. J Pharmacol Exp Ther. 2009, 328:116- 22. (Highlighted by the journal)

Awards and Recognitions:

  • 2005 BIRCWH/NIH scholar
  • 2009-2012, and 2015: AASLD Presidential Poster Awards

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Drew A. Helmer, MD, MS

drew_helmer

Director, War Related Illness and Injury Study Center (WRIISC) at East Orange, New Jersey

Academic Title and School Affiliation:

Associate Professor, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, New Jersey Medical School

Education:

  • University of Minnesota, B.S., Minneapolis, Minnesota
  • Columbia University, M.D./M.S., New York, New York

Areas of Research Interest:

  • Ambulatory Care Utilization
  • Patient Outcomes
  • Deployment Health

Memberships:

  • Society of General Internal Medicine
  • AcademyHealth

Select Publications:

  1. Waid-Ebbs JK, Wen P, Graham DP, Ray K, Leroux AJ, O’Connor MK, Helmer DA. Factor Structure of the Community Reintegration of Service-members (CRIS) in Veterans with Blast-Related Mild Traumatic Brain Injury. Journal of Applied Measurement. Winter 2018; 19(4): (In Press).
  2. Fox, A., Helmer, D., Tseng, C., McCarron, K., Satcher, S., Osinubi, O.Autonomic symptoms in Gulf War Veterans evaluated at the War Related Illness and Injury Study Center. Military Medicine. (In Press).
  3. Khalil L, McNeil RB, Sims KJ, Felder KA, Hauser ER, Goldstein KM, Voils CI, Klimas NG, Brophy MT, Thomas CM, Whitley RL, Dursa EK, Helmer DA, Provenzale DT. The Gulf War Era Cohort and Biorepository: A Longitudinal Research Resource of Veterans of the 1990-1991 Gulf War Era. Am J Epidemiol. 2018 Jul 30. doi:10.1093/aje/kwy147. [Epub ahead of print].
  4. McAndrew LM, Helmer DA, Lu SE, Chandler HK, Slotkin S, Quigley KS. Longitudinal relationship between onset of physical symptoms and functional impairment. J Behav Med. 2018 Jun 9. doi: 10.1007/s10865-018-9937-4. [Epub ahead of print].
  5. Mohanty AF, McAndrew LM, Helmer D, Samore MH, Gundlapalli AV. Chronic Multisymptom Illness among Iraq/Afghanistan-Deployed US Veterans and Their Healthcare Utilization within the Veterans Health Administration. J Gen Intern Med. 2018 May 24. doi: 10.1007/s11606-018-4479-6. [Epub ahead of print]
  6. McAndrew LM, Friedlander ML, Phillips LA, Santos S, Helmer DA. Concordance of illness perceptions: The key to improving care of medically unexplained symptoms. J Psychosom Res. 2018 Aug; 111:140-142.
  7. Fried DA, Rajan M, Tseng CL, Helmer D. Impact of presumed service-connected diagnosis on the Department of Veterans Affairs healthcare utilization patterns of Vietnam-Theater Veterans: A cross-sectional study. Medicine (Baltimore). 2018 May; 97(19):e0662.
  8. Fox A, Helmer D, Tseng CL, Patrick-DeLuca L, Osinubi O. Report of Autonomic Symptoms in a Clinical Sample of Veterans with Gulf War Illness. Mil Med. 2018 Mar 1; 183(3-4):e179-e185.
  9. Falvo MJ, Helmer DA, Klein JC, Osinubi OY, Ndirangu D, Patrick-DeLuca LA, Sotolongo AM. Isolated diffusing capacity reduction is a common clinical presentation in deployed Iraq and Afghanistan veterans with deployment-related environmental exposures. Clin Respir J. 2018 Feb; 12(2):795-798.
  10. Helmer DA, Rowneki M, Feng X, Tseng CL, Rose D, Soroka O, Fried D, Jani N, Pogach LM, Sambamoorthi U. State-Level Variability in Veteran Reliance on Veterans Health Administration and Potentially Preventable Hospitalizations: A Geospatial Analysis. Inquiry. 2018 Jan-Dec; 55: 46958018756216.
  11. McAndrew, LM, Greenberg, L, Ciccone, D, Helmer, DA, Chandler, H. Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Veterans with Chronic Multisymptom Illness. Military Behavioral Health. 2018; 6(1): 56-65.
  12. Wen PS, Waid-Ebbs JK, Graham DP, Helmer DA. Psychometric Properties of 2 Participation Measures in Veterans With Mild Traumatic Brain Injury. Arch Phys Med Rehabil. 2018 Feb; 99(2S):S86-S93.
  13. McAndrew LM, Phillips LA, Helmer DA, Maestro K, Engel CC, Greenberg LM, Anastasides N, Quigley KS. High healthcare utilization near the onset of medically unexplained symptoms. J Psychosom Res. 2017 Jul; 98:98-105.
  14. Fried DA, Passannante M, Helmer D, Holland BK, Halperin WE. The Health and Social Isolation of American Veterans Denied Veterans Affairs Disability Compensation. Health Soc Work. 2017 Feb 1; 42(1):7-14.
  15. McAndrew LM, Held RF, Abbi B, Quigley KS, Helmer DA, Pasupuleti R, Chandler HK. Less engagement in pleasurable activities is associated with poorer quality of life for Veterans with comorbid post-deployment conditions. Military Psychology. 2017; 29(1): 74-81.
  16. Jani N, Falvo MJ, Sotolongo A, Osinubi OY, Tseng C, Rowneki M, Montopoli M, Morley SW, Mitchell V, Helmer DA. Blast Injury and Cardiopulmonary Symptoms in U.S. Veterans: Analysis of a National Registry. Annals of Internal Medicine. 2017; 167(10): 753–5.
  17. Held RF, Santos S, Marki M, Helmer D. Veteran Perceptions, Interest, and Use of Complementary and Alternative Medicine. Federal Practitioner. 2016 Sep; 33(9):65-71.
  18. Held RF, Santos S, Marki M, Helmer D. Dissemination and implementation of an educational tool for veterans on complementary and alternative medicine: a case study. BMC Complement Altern Med. 2016 Sep 2; 16:340.
  19. Liu J, Lezama N, Gasper J, Kawata J, Morley S, Helmer D, Ciminera P. Burn Pit Emissions Exposure and Respiratory and Cardiovascular Conditions Among Airborne Hazards and Open Burn Pit Registry Participants. J Occup Environ Med. 2016 Jul; 58(7):e249-55.
  20. Falvo MJ, Abraham JH, Osinubi OY, Klein JC, Sotolongo AM, Ndirangu D, Patrick-DeLuca LA, Helmer DA. Bronchodilator Responsiveness and Airflow Limitation Are Associated With Deployment Length in Iraq and Afghanistan Veterans. J Occup Environ Med. 2016 Apr; 58(4):325-8.
  21. Beaulieu GR, Latini DM, Helmer DA, Powers-James C, Houlette C, Kauth MR An Exploration of Returning Veterans’ Sexual Health Issues Using a Brief Self-report Measure. Sexual Medicine. 2015 Nov 2; 3(4):287-94.
  22. Fried DA, Helmer DA, Halperin WE, Passannante M, Holland BK. Health and Health Care Service Utilization among U.S. Veterans Denied VA Service-Connected Disability Compensation: A Review of the Literature. Military Medicine. 2015 Oct; 180(10):1034-40.
  23. McAndrew LM, Helmer DA, Phillips LA, Chandler H, Ray K, Quigley KS. Iraq and Afghanistan Veterans report symptoms consistent with chronic multisymptom illness one year after deployment. JRRD, 2016; 53(1):59-70.
  24. Mohanty AF, Helmer DA, Muthukutty A, McAndrew LM, Carter ME, Judd J, Garvin JH, Samore MH, Gundlapalli AV. Fibromyalgia care of Iraq and Afghanistan-Deployed Veterans in the Veterans Health Administration. 2016; 53(1):45-58.
  25. Denneson LM, Teo AR, Ganzini L, Helmer DA, Bair MJ, Dobscha SK. Military Veterans’ Experiences with Suicidal Ideation: Implications for Intervention and Prevention. Suicide Life Threat Behav. 2015 Aug; 45(4):399-414.
  26. Helmer DA, Beaulieu G, Powers C, Houlette C, Latini D, Kauth M. Perspectives on sexual health and function of recent male combat veterans of Iraq and Afghanistan. Sexual Medicine: Open Access. 2015 Sep; 3(3):137-46.
  27. Mohanty AF, Muthukutty A, Carter ME, Palmer MN, Judd J, Helmer DA, McAndrew LM, Garvin JH, Samore MH, Gundlapalli AV. Chronic Multisymptom Illness Among Female Veterans Deployed to Iraq and Afghanistan. Medical Care.2015; 53(4 Suppl 1):S143-8.
  28. Falvo MJ, Osinubi OY, Sotolongo AM, Helmer DA. Airborne Hazards Exposure and Respiratory Health of Iraq and Afghanistan Veterans. Epidemiologic Reviews. 2015; 37:116-30.
  29. Ho L, Lange G, Zhao W, Wang J, Rooney R, Patel DH, Fobler MM, Helmer DA, Elder G, Shaughness MC, Ahlers ST, Russo SJ, Pasinetti GM. Select small nucleolar RNAs in blood components as novel biomarkers for improved identification of comorbid traumatic brain injury and post-traumatic stress disorder in veterans of the conflicts in Afghanistan and Iraq. Am J Neurodegener Dis. 2014; 3(3):170-81.
  30. Denneson LM, Corson K, Helmer DA, Bair MJ, Dobscha SK. Mental health utilization of new-to-care Iraq and Afghanistan Veterans following suicidal ideation assessment. Psychiatry Res. 2014 Jul 30; 217(3):147-53.
  31. Dobscha S, Denneson LM, Kovas AE, Corson K, Helmer DA, Bair MJ. Primary care clinician responses to positive suicidal ideation risk assessments in Veterans of Iraq and Afghanistan. General Hospital Psychiatry. 2014 May-Jun; 36(3):310-7.
  32. Bayley PJ, Kong JY, Helmer DA, Schneiderman A, Roselli LA, Rosse SM, Jackson JA, Baldwin J, Isaac L, Nolasco M, Blackman MR, Reinhard MJ, Ashford JW, Chapman JC; MIND Study Group. Challenges to be overcome using population-based sampling methods to recruit veterans for a study of post-traumatic stress disorder and traumatic brain injury. BMC Med Res Methodol. 2014 Apr 8; 14:48.
  33. Lange G, McAndrew L, Ashford JW, Reinhard M, Peterson M, Helmer DA. War Related Illness and Injury Study Center (WRIISC): a multidisciplinary translational approach to the care of Veterans with Chronic Multisymptom Illness. Mil Med. 2013 Jul; 178(7):705-7.
  34. Ganzini L, Denneson LM, Press N, Bair MJ, Helmer DA, Poat J, Dobscha S. Trust is the Basis for Effective Screening for Suicidal Ideation in Veterans. J Gen Intern Med. 2013 Sep; 28(9):1215-21.
  35. Corson K, Denneson LM, Bair MJ, Helmer DA, Goulet JL, Dobscha SK. Prevalence and Correlates of Suicidal Ideation among Operation Enduring Freedom and Operation Iraqi Freedom Veterans. Journal of Affective Disorders. 2013 Jul; 149(1-3):291-8.
  36. Hosain GM, Latini DM, Kauth MR, Goltz HH, Helmer DA. Racial and Ethnic Differences in Sexual Dysfunction Among Post-deployed Iraq and Afghanistan Veterans. Am J Mens Health. 2013 Sep; 7(5):374-81.
  37. Graham DP, Helmer DA, Harding MJ, Kosten TR, Petersen NJ, Nielsen DA. Serotonin transporter genotype and mild traumatic brain injury independently influence resilience and perception of limitations in Veterans. Journal of Psychiatric Research. 2013 Jun; 47(6):835-42.
  38. Dobscha SK, Corson K, Helmer D, Bair M, Denneson LM, Brandt C, Beane A, Ganzini L. Brief assessment for suicidal ideation in OEF/OIF veterans with positive depression screens. General Hospital Psychiatry, 2013 May-Jun; 35(3):272-8.
  39. Helmer DA, Beaulieu GR, Houlette C, Latini D, Goltz HH, Etienne S, Kauth M. Assessment and Documentation of Sexual Health Issues of Recent Combat Veterans seeking VHA Care. J Sex Medicine. 2013 Apr; 10(4):1065-73.
  40. Hosain GM, Latini DM, Kauth M, Honore-Goltz H, Helmer DA. Sexual dysfunction among male Veterans returning from Iraq and Afghanistan: Prevalence and correlates. J Sex Medicine. 2013 Feb; 10(2):516-523.

Awards and Recognitions:

  • Ex-Officio Member, VA representative to the Chronic Fatigue Syndrome Advisory Committee to the Secretary of Health and Human Services, 2016 – present
  • Ex-Officio Member, VA representative to the Warrior Care Network, 2016 – present
  • Test Item Writer, United States Medical License Exam, Joining Forces/National Board of Medical Examiners, 2015 – present
  • Executive Committee/Scientific & Ethical Oversight Committee Member, Cooperative Studies Program 585 “Gulf War Era Cohort and Biorepository”, 2014 – present
  • Clinical Champion and Leader of the Workgroup on Management for the revision of the VA/DoD clinical practice guideline on Chronic Multisymptom Illness

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alejandro_interianAlejandro Interian, PhD

Clinical Psychologist,
Mental Health & Behavioral Sciences

Academic Title and School Affiliation:

Adjunct Assistant Professor

Education:

  • Nova Southeastern University (APA Accredited Program), Clinical Psychology, Ph.D., Fort Lauderdale, Florida, (2001)
  • Nova Southeastern University (APA Accredited Program), Clinical Psychology, M.S., Fort Lauderdale, Florida, (1997)
  • University of Florida, Psychology, B.S. with Honors, Gainesville, Florida, (1995)

Areas of Research Interest:

  • Suicide
  • Telehealth
  • Mental health challenges in Parkinson’s disease

Select Publications:

  1. Dobkin, R., Interian, A., Durland, L., Gara, M., & Menza, M. (in press). Personalized Telemedicine for Depression in Parkinson’s disease: A Pilot Trial. Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry and Neurology.
  2. Lewis-Fernández, R., Coombs, A.A., Balán, I.C., Interian, A. Motivational Interviewing: Overcoming disparities in pharmacotherapy engagement. (in press). Journal of Clinical Psychiatry.
  3. Interian, A., King, A., St. Hill, L., Robinson, C., & Damschroder, L. (2017). Evaluating the implementation of home-based videoconferencing for providing mental health services. Psychiatric Services, 69(1), 69-75.
  4. Interian, A., Megan, C., Kline, A., Miller, R., St. Hill, L., Latorre, M., Shcherbakov, A., King, A., & Stanley, B. (in press). Use of the Columbia-Suicide Severity Rating Scale (C-SSRS) to Classify Suicidal behaviors. Archives of suicide research, 22(2), 278-294.
  5. Interian, A., Kline, A., Perlick, D., Dixon, L., Feder, A., Weiner, M.D., Goldstein, M.F., Hennessy, K., St. Hill, L., & Losonczy, M. (2016). A Randomized Controlled Trial of a Brief Internet-Based Intervention for Families of Veterans. Journal of Rehabilitation Research and Development, 53, 629-640.
  6. Kline, A., Chesin, M., Latorre, M., Miller, R., Hill, L. S., Shcherbakov, A., King, A., Stanley, B., Weiner, M. D. & Interian, A. (2016). Rationale and study design of a trial of mindfulness-based cognitive therapy for preventing suicidal behavior (MBCT-S) in military veterans. Contemporary Clinical Trials, 50, 245-252.
  7. Kline, A., Weiner, M. D., Interian, A., Shcherbakov, A., & St Hill, L. (2016). Morbid thoughts and suicidal ideation in Iraq war veterans: the role of direct and indirect killing in combat. Depression and Anxiety, 33(6), 473-482.
  8. Chesin, M., Interian, A., Kline, A., Benjamin-Phillips, C., Latorre, M., & Stanley, B. (2016). Reviewing Mindfulness-Based Interventions for Suicidal Behavior. Archives of Suicide Research, 20, 507-527.
  9. Durland, L., Interian, A., Pretzer-Aboff, I., & Dobkin, R. D. (2014). The Effect of Telehealth-to-Home Interventions on Quality of Life for Individuals with Depressive and Anxiety Disorders. Smart Homecare Technology and TeleHealth, 2, 105–119.
  10. Interian, A., Kline, A., Janal, M., Glynn, S., & Losonczy, M. (2014). Multiple deployments and combat trauma: Do homefront stressors increase the risk for post-traumatic stress symptoms? Journal of Traumatic Stress, 27, 90-97.
  11. Kline, A., Weiner, M.D., Ciccone D.S., Interian, A., Hill, L., & Losonczy, M. (2014). Increased risk of alcohol dependency in a cohort of National Guard Troops with PTSD: A longitudinal study,” Journal of Psychiatric Research , 50, 18–25.
  12. Interian, A., Lewis-Fernández, R., Gara, M. A., & Escobar, J. I. (2013). A Randomized-Controlled Trial of An Intervention to Improve Antidepressant Adherence among Latinos with Depression. Depression and Anxiety, 30, 688-696.
  13. Kline, A., Ciccone D.S., Weiner, M.D., Interian, A., St. Hill, L., Falca-Dodson, M., Black, C., Losonczy, M. (2013). Gender differences in the risk and protective factors associated with PTSD: A prospective study of National Guard troops deployed to Iraq. Psychiatry, 73, 256-272.
  14. Interian, A., Lewis-Fernandez, R., & Dixon, L. (2013). Interventions to Improve Mental Health Treatment Engagement among Underserved Racial-Ethnic Minority Populations: A Systematic Review of Recent Literature. Psychiatric Services, 64, 212–222.

Awards/Recognitions:

  • Young Investigator Award, National Alliance for Research on Schizophrenia and Depression (NARSAD), (2003)
  • Mentored Career Development Award, National Institute of Mental Health, (2005)

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Steven W. Levison, PhD

steven_levison

Health Science Specialist,
Research Service

Academic Title and School Affiliation:

Research Physiologist

Education:

  • Undergraduate Education: University of Rochester, Rochester, NY, BS in Neuroscience
  • Graduate Education: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC, Ph.D. in Neurobiology.
  • Postdoctoral Fellowship: Dept. of Pathology, Columbia University, College of
    Physicians and Surgeons, NY, NY

Areas of Research Interest:

  • Traumatic brain injury
  • Astrogliosis
  • Microgliosis
  • Neurotrophic factors
  • Neural stem cells
  • Regenerative medicine

Personal Statement:

Two broad themes have run concurrently through my research career – one being the study of glial reactions to injury and the other the study of the neural stem cells and progenitors of the subventricular zone in development. Over the course of my 20+ year career, I have gained extensive research experience in studies of normal brain development, the role of neuroinflammation in gliosis, as well as the regenerative response elicited by injuries to the brain. Moreover, my lab has used a variety of animal models of CNS injury and disease for our studies. I have been funded by the NIH since establishing my independent laboratory in 1993 and have collaborated extensively during my career. A longstanding interest of my lab is in elucidating the roles of IL-6 family cytokines in CNS injury, which extend back to collaborative studies that I performed in 1993 as a post-doc, where we evaluated the role of CNTF in astrogliosis. Since then my lab has studied other members of the IL-6 family and most recently we have focused on LIF. More specifically, we have been evaluating the roles of IL-6 family members in neural stem cell and progenitor cell self-renewal and how neural stem cells and progenitors are acutely and chronically affected by perinatal hypoxia-ischemia, pre-term brain injury and traumatic brain injury. We assess molecular, cellular and behavioral parameters and our experiments are performed on rats and on genetically engineered mice to elucidate the roles of specific signaling molecules in the responses of specific cell types. I have been consistently productive, having published over 95 peer reviewed articles to date with an h-index of 41.

Memberships:

  • Society for Neuroscience
  • American Society for Neurochemistry
  • International Society for Developmental Neuroscience
  • International Society for Neurochemistry
  • International Society for Stem Cell Research

Select Publications:

  1. Goodus MT, Kerr NA, Talwar R, Buziashvili D, Fragale JE, Pang KC, Levison SW. Leukemia Inhibitory Factor Haplodeficiency Desynchronizes Glial Reactivity and Exacerbates Damage and Functional Deficits after a Concussive Brain Injury. J Neurotrauma. 2016 Aug 15;33(16):1522-34. PubMed PMID: 26541248.
  2. Clausi MG, Kumari E, Levison SW. Unmasking the responses of the stem cells and progenitors in the subventricular zone after neonatal and pediatric brain injuries. Neural Regen Res. 2016 Jan;11(1):45-8. PubMed PMID: 26981076; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC4774221.
  3. Goodus MT, Guzman AM, Calderon F, Jiang Y, Levison SW. Neural stem cells in the immature, but not the mature, subventricular zone respond robustly to traumatic brain injury. Dev Neurosci. 2015;37(1):29-42. PubMed PMID: 25377490.
  4. Yang Z, Covey MV, Bitel CL, Ni L, Jonakait GM, Levison SW. Sustained neocortical neurogenesis after neonatal hypoxic/ischemic injury. Ann Neurol. 2007 Mar;61(3):199-208. PubMed PMID: 17286251.
  5. Felling RJ, Snyder MJ, Romanko MJ, Rothstein RP, Ziegler AN, Yang Z, Givogri MI, Bongarzone ER, Levison SW. Neural stem/progenitor cells participate in the regenerative response to perinatal hypoxia/ischemia. J Neurosci. 2006 Apr 19;26(16):4359-69. PubMed PMID: 16624956.
  6. Guardia Clausi M, Levison SW. Delayed ALK5 inhibition improves functional recovery in neonatal brain injury. J Cereb Blood Flow Metab. 2017 Mar;37(3):787-800. PubMed PMID: 26984936; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC5363459.
  7. Buono KD, Goodus MT, Guardia Clausi M, Jiang Y, Loporchio D, Levison SW. Mechanisms of mouse neural precursor expansion after neonatal hypoxia-ischemia. J Neurosci. 2015 Jun 10;35(23):8855-65. PubMed PMID: 26063918; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC4461690.
  8. Basu A, Lazovic J, Krady JK, Mauger DT, Rothstein RP, Smith MB, Levison SW. Interleukin-1 and the interleukin-1 type 1 receptor are essential for the progressive neurodegeneration that ensues subsequent to a mild hypoxic/ischemic injury. J Cereb Blood Flow Metab. 2005 Jan;25(1):17-29. PubMed PMID: 15678109.
  9. Basu A, Krady JK, O’Malley M, Styren SD, DeKosky ST, Levison SW. The type 1 interleukin-1 receptor is essential for the efficient activation of microglia and the induction of multiple proinflammatory mediators in response to brain injury. J Neurosci. 2002 Jul 15;22(14):6071-82. PubMed PMID: 12122068.
  10. Buono KD, Vadlamuri D, Gan Q, Levison SW. Leukemia inhibitory factor is essential for subventricular zone neural stem cell and progenitor homeostasis as revealed by a novel flow cytometric analysis. Dev Neurosci. 2012;34(5):449-62. PubMed PMID: 23258129; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC3583360.
  11. Levison SW, Goldman JE. Both oligodendrocytes and astrocytes develop from progenitors in the subventricular zone of postnatal rat forebrain. Neuron. 1993 Feb;10(2):201-12. PubMed PMID: 8439409.
  12. Levison SW, Chuang C, Abramson BJ, Goldman JE. The migrational patterns and developmental fates of glial precursors in the rat subventricular zone are temporally regulated. Development. 1993 Nov;119(3):611-22. PubMed PMID: 8187632.

Awards and Recognitions:

  • 1983- Graduated with High Distinction, University of Rochester
  • 1995- Fellowship, Winter Conference on Brain Research
  • 2002- Service Award, Central PA Chapter, National Multiple Sclerosis Society
  • 2005- Medical Student Teaching Award, Penn State College of Medicine
  • 2007- Traveling Lecturer, Grass Foundation
  • 2008- Medical Excellence Award, Foundation of UMDNJ
  • 2010- Excellence in Research Award, Foundation of UMDNJ
  • 2013- Excellence in Teaching Award, Foundation of UMDNJ
  • 2015- Dean’s Outstanding Educator Award, Rutgers Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences

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Catherine E. Myers, PhD

catherine_myers

Health Science Specialist,
Research Service

Academic Title and School Affiliation:

Professor, Department of Neurology and Neurosciences, Rutgers New Jersey Medical School

Education:

  • University of Delaware, Cognitive and Computer Science, B.S. with Distinction, Newark, Delaware, (1987)
  • University of London, Imperial College, Electrical Engineering, Ph.D., London, United Kingdom, (1990)

Areas of Research Interest:

  • Experimental neuropsychology (brain bases of learning and memory)
  • Vulnerability to Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)
  • Early diagnosis of Alzheimer’s Disease
  • Prediction of Risk for Suicidal Behavior
  • Computational neuroscience

Memberships:

  • Society for Neuroscience
  • Pavlovian Society
  • Association for Psychological Science

Select Publications:

  1. Sinha, N., Reagh, Z. M., Tustison, N. J., Shaw, A., Myers, C. E., Hill, D., Yassa, M. A. & Gluck, M. A. (2018/in press). ABCA7 risk variant in healthy older African Americans is associated with a functionally isolated entorhinal cortex mediating deficient generalization of prior discrimination training. Hippocampus, to appear.
  2. Caulfield, M. D. & Myers, C. E. (2018). Post-traumatic stress symptoms are associated with better performance on a delayed match-to-position task. PeerJ, 6:e4701.
  3. Petok, J. R., Myers, C. E., Pa, J., Hobel, Z., Wharton, D., Medina, L. D., Casado, M., Coppola, G., Gluck, M. A. & Ringman, J. R. (2018). Impairment of memory generalization in preclinical autosomal dominant Alzheimer’s disease mutation carriers. Neurobiology of Aging, 65:149-157.
  4. Allen, M. T., Jameson, M. M. & Myers, C. E. (2017). Beyond behavioral inhibition: A computer avatar task designed to assess behavioral inhibition extends to harm avoidance. Frontiers in Psychology, 8:1560.
  5. Sheynin, J., Shind, C., Radell, M., Ebanks-Williams, Y., Gilbertson, M. W., Beck, K. D., & Myers, C. E. (2017). Greater avoidance behavior in individuals with posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms. Stress, 20(3):285-293.
  6. Radell, M. L., Beck, K. D., Gilbertson, M. W. & Myers, C. E. (2017). Post-traumatic stress disorder symptom burden and gender each affect contextual generalization in a reward- and punishment-learning task. PLOS ONE, 12(2):e017244.
  7. Myers, C. E., Radell, M. L., Shind, C., Ebanks-Williams, Y., Beck, K. D. & Gilbertson, M. W. (2016). Beyond symptom self-report: Use of a computer “avatar” to assess post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms in veterans. Stress, 19(6):593-598.
  8. O’Connell, G., Myers, C. E., Hopkins, R. O., McLaren, R. P., Gluck, M. A. & Wills, A. J. (2016). Amnesic patients show superior generalization in category learning. Neuropsychology, 30(8):915-919.
  9. Scharfman, H. E. & Myers, C. E. (2016). Corruption of the dentate gyrus by “dominant” granule cells: Implications for dentate gyrus function in health and disease. Neurobiology of Learning and Memory, 129:69-82.
  10. Myers, C. E., Kostek, J. A., Ekeh, B., Sanchez, R., Ebanks-Williams, Y., Krusznis, A. L., Weinflash, N., & Servatius, R. (2016). Watch what I do, not what I say I do: Computer-based “avatars” to assess behavioral inhibition, a vulnerability factor for anxiety disorders. Computers in Human Behavior, 55:804-816.

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Kevin Pang, PhD

kevin_pang

Research Physiologist,
Research Service

Academic Title and School Affiliation:

Professor, Department of Neurology and Neurosciences, Rutgers New Jersey Medical School

Education:

PhD Pharmacology, University of Colorado Medical Center

Areas of Research Interest:

  • Anxiety Disorders
  • Traumatic Brain Injury
  • Learning
  • Memory
  • Attention
  • Behavioral Economics

Select Publications:

  1. Spiegler, K.M., I.M. Smith and K.C.H. Pang (2019) Danger and safety signals independently influence persistent pathological avoidance in anxiety-vulnerable Wistar Kyoto rats: A role for impaired configural learning in anxiety vulnerability, Behavioural Brain Research, 356:78-88.
  2. Fortress, A.M., I.M. Smith and K.C.H. Pang (2018) Ketamine facilitates extinction of avoidance behavior and enhances synaptic plasticity in a rat model of anxiety vulnerability: Implications for the pathophysiology and treatment of anxiety disorders, Neuropharmacology, 137:372-381.
  3. Spiegler, K.M.*, A.M. Fortress* and K.C.H. Pang (2018) Differential use of danger and safety signals in an animal model of anxiety vulnerability: The behavioral economics of avoidance, Progress in Neuropsychopharmacology & Biological Psychiatry, 82:195-204. * = Contributed equally
  4. Fragale, J.E.C., K.D. Beck and K. C.H. Pang (2017) Use of the Exponential and Exponentiated Demand Equations to Assess the Behavioral Economics of Negative Reinforcement, Frontiers in Neuroscience, vol 11, article 77.
  5. Sinha, S.P., P. Avcu, K.M. Spiegler, S. Komaravolu, K. Kim, T. Cominski, R.J. Servatius and K.C.H. Pang (2017) Startle suppression after mild traumatic brain injury is associated with an increase in pro-inflammatory cytokines, reactive gliosis and neuronal loss in the caudal pontine reticular nucleus. Brain, Behavior, and Immunity, 61:353-364.
  6. Servatius, R.J., C.E. Marx, S. Sinha, P. Avcu, J.D. Kilts, J.C. Naylor and K.C. Pang (2016) Brain and serum androsterone is elevated in response to stress in rats with mild traumatic brain injury, Frontiers in Neuroscience, vol 10, article 379.
  7. Janke, K.L., T.P. Cominski, E.V. Kuzhikandathil, R.J. Servatius and K.C.H. Pang (2015) Investigating the role of hippocampal BDNF in anxiety vulnerability using classical eyeblink conditioning, Frontiers in Psychiatry, Vol 6, Article 106.
  8. Pang, K.C.H., S. Sinha, P. Avcu, J.J. Roland, N. Nadpara, B. Pfister, M. Long, V. Santhakumar and R.J. Servatius (2015) Long-lasting suppression of acoustic startle response following mild traumatic brain injury, Journal of Neurotrauma, 32:801-810.
  9. Cominski, T.P., X. Jiao, J.E. Catuzzi, A.L. Stewart and K.C.H. Pang (2014) The role of the hippocampus in avoidance learning and anxiety vulnerability. Frontiers in Behavioral Neuroscience, Vol 8, Article 273.
  10. Roland, J.J., K.L., Janke, R.J. Servatius and K.C.H. Pang (2014) GABAergic neurons in the medial septal-diagonal band (MSDB) are important for acquisition of delay classically conditioned eyeblink response. Brain Structure and Function, 219:1231-1237.
  11. Roland, J.J., A.L. Stewart, K.L. Janke, M.R. Gielow, J.A. Kostek, L.M. Savage, R.J. Servatius and K.C.H. Pang (2014) Medial septum-diagonal band of Broca (MSDB) GABAergic regulation of hippocampal acetylcholine efflux is dependent on cognitive demands. Journal of Neuroscience, 34:506-514.

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Jorge M. Serrador, PhD

jorge_serrador

Biological Scientist, War Related Illness & Injury Study Center (WRIISC)

Academic Title and School Affiliation:

  • Associate Professor, Department of Pharmacology, Physiology & Neuroscience Rutgers Biomedical and Health Sciences
  • Track Co-Director, Biomedical Engineering Graduate Program, New Jersey Medical School
  • Adjunct Professor of Cardiovascular Electronics National University of Ireland, Galway

Education:

  • B.Sc. (Physiology), University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario, Canada, 1987-1992
  • B.A. (Honours Psychology), University of Waterloo Waterloo, Ontario, Canada, 1987-1993
  • M.Sc. (Kinesiology), University of Waterloo. Waterloo, Ontario, Canada, 1995-1997
  • Ph.D. (Kinesiology), The University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, Canada, 1997-2000

Areas of Research Interest:

Cerebral Blood Flow Regulation

For the last 20 years I have been interested in cerebral blood flow regulation. Maintaining proper cerebral blood flow is essential for not only life, but proper cognitive function. Cerebral blood flow regulation involves several regulatory systems. 1) Cerebral autoregulation which responds to pressure changes; 2) Autonomic controls of cerebral circulation which remains controversial; 3) Endothelial mediated dilation of the cerebral vessels; and 4) neurovascular coupling in the cerebral circulation.

My lab focuses on contributing both to the basic understanding of the physiology of the cerebral circulation in humans as well as the pathophysiology of many conditions. Our lab has demonstrated that cerebral blood flow decreases prior to syncope, even though cerebral autoregulation remains intact. That cerebral autoregulation is unaffected by aging and may actually be improved in hypertension. We also found that autoregulation is impaired in subarachnoid hemorrhage and this impairment may occur prior to the development of vasospasm.

Our current work is looking at cerebral blood flow regulation in concussion/mTBI and in Veterans who were exposed to a blast wave. We have been focusing on detecting early changes in cerebral blood flow regulation and how this might be used as both an early diagnostic as well as a target for treatment. In addition, we are currently studying the long term physiological effects of mTBI to better understand the chronic symptoms that sometimes persist.

Examining the role of the Vestibular System in Cardiovascular and Cerebrovascular Control

Humans have evolved to spend the majority of their waking hours in the upright posture. Since this means the brain is now above the heart, the generator of blood pressure, human brains must adapt to a lower perfusion pressure because of gravity. Thus, every time we move from the supine to upright posture, our cerebral blood vessels must dilate to deal with the lower pressure. The vestibular system tells up about our position in space and relative to gravity. I am interested in examining the role that the vestibular system may play in assisting in the dilation of cerebral blood vessels to maintain brain blood flow.

I have previously found that stimulating the vestibular system causes changes in cerebral blood flow (BMC Neuroscience, 2009). Thus, loss of vestibular function, common in many conditions including head trauma, aging, etc., could result in reduced brain blood flow when upright, possibly explaining some of the cognitive impairment we see in these groups. My interest in this stems from my work to understand Post Spaceflight Orthostatic Intolerance. Astronauts who are extremely healthy, have trouble standing for 10 min, even if they were only in space for 14 days. A possible reason for this rapid loss of the adaptation to the upright posture may be because they have adapted to zero gravity by no longer sensing the gravity vector. So when they return to earth they are no longer dilating cerebral blood vessels when they stand up.

I am very interested in better understanding how vestibular loss may be involved in the development of reduced brain blood flow.

Assessing Vestibular Loss and Developing New Treatments

Since I believe that the vestibular system may be essential in the integrative response to maintaining brain blood flow when upright, I am interested in determining what conditions may be associated with vestibular loss that are currently being underdiagnosed. My lab did a large study of 151 individuals from 21-93 to examine otolith (part of vestibular system that senses gravity) function and found that there was a continual decline in function with each decade. This work highlights how loss of the ability to sense gravity is prevalent with aging. Interestingly, global cerebral blood flow also decreases with each decade of life. Based on my theory that brain blood flow may depend on intact otolith function, this suggests a connection with otolith loss.

We have also been working on improving otolith function using stochastic resonance (detailed below). We have been able to improve vestibular ocular reflexes using this technique as well as balance. We currently have a clinical trial to treat balance loss using this technique. We are also working to see if improve otolith function with stochastic resonance could also improve brain blood flow when upright.

Enhancing Neural Systems Using Stochastic Resonance

Stochastic Resonance is a novel physics principle that when applied to neural systems has been found to enhance their function. The basis of stochastic resonance is that if you apply low levels of random stimulus to a neural system it makes that system more sensitive and restores lost function. Using this principle, I have been able to enhance function in several neural systems. We have successfully improved the vestibular system (essential for balance) in elderly and patients with balance impairments. Using this specialized stimulation, we have been able to improve ocular torsion, a vestibular ocular reflex mediated by the otoliths, something that no one has previously done. Based on this success I now am performing a clinical trial to develop a portable device to improve balance that is funded by the department of defense.

Using the same stochastic resonance principle, we have been able to also improve sensory function in the feet. We have been able to improve vibration perception threshold in a variety of participants including healthy controls, elderly and even patients with diabetic neuropathy. Peripheral neuropathy is a difficult to treat condition and our work using stochastic resonance may provide a novel method of treatment. We are currently looking at expanding this program to examine other neurodegenerative diseases as well.

Sex Differences in Human Physiology

An important consideration in integrative human physiology that has been understudied is sex differences. My lab is very interested in understanding how physiological response differ between men and women. In addition, we believe that understanding these differences could help us to understand some of the differences in prevalence of conditions such as stroke, headache, etc. I have previously found that cerebral autoregulation is better in women than men of all ages. We have also reported that women show greater declines in otolith function with age than men. These findings highlight the importance of considering sex in physiological research. We are currently expanding to also consider race as another factor.

Personal Statement:

In a nutshell, the focus of my research is on integrative human physiology. Within this area I have several main areas of research:

  • Understanding Cerebral Blood Flow Regulation
  • Examining the role of the Vestibular System in Cardiovascular and Cerebrovascular Control
  • Assessing Vestibular Loss and Developing New Treatments
  • Enhancing Neural Systems using Stochastic Resonance
  • Sex Differences in Human Physiology

All of my work is done with human participants and patients and we primarily use non-invasive techniques to understand the physiology.

Memberships:

  • Fellow of the Royal Barany Society, International Vestibular Society, 06/2017-Present
  • Cerebral Autoregulation Research Network, Steering Committee Member, 04/2013-04/2017
  • American Physiological Society, Communications Committee Member, 01/2013-12/2017
  • Cerebral Autoregulation Research Network, Member, 07/2011-Present
  • Association for Research in Otolaryngology, Member, 01/2010-Present
  • American Autonomic Society, Member, 01/2009-Present
  • International Society of Cerebral Blood Flow & Metabolism, Member, 01/2002-Present
  • American Physiological Society, Member, 01/1996-Present
  • American Physiological Society-National Task Force on Trainees, Member, 01/2001-12/2003
  • The Gerontological Society of America, Member, 01/2006-12/2008
  • Harvard Medical School Division on Aging, National Institutes of Health T32 Training Grant, 01/2004-12/2007
  • American College Sports Medicine, Member, 01/1998-12/2004
  • Canadian Society of Exercise Physiologists, Member, 01/1997-12/2004

Select Publications:

Dr. Serrador’s publications on the National Center for Biotechnology Information website

Awards and Recognitions:

  • Top 50 Most Cited Articles, (#32, cited 528 times), “MRI Measures of Middle Cerebral Artery Diameter in Conscious Humans during Simulated Orthostasis.” Stroke (Journal: Impact Factor 6.6; H Index 240), 10/2009-Present
  • Top 10 Most Accessed Articles, (6,952 accesses), “Vestibular Effects on Cerebral Blood Flow” BMC Neuroscience (Journal: Impact Factor 2.7; H Index 65), 09/2009
  • 2nd Runner Up, Space Medicine Branch Young Investigator Award, Aerospace Medical Association, 05/2004
  • American Physiological Society Travel Award, International Physiology Meeting, Auckland, New Zealand, 08/2001
  • Post-Doctoral Fellowship Award, Heart and Stroke Foundation of Canada, 09/2000-08/2002
  • Schumann Cardiovascular Research Fellowship, Hebrew Rehabilitation Center for the Aged, 09/2000-08/2002
  • University of Western Ontario Graduate Tuition Scholarship, University of Western Ontario, 09/1998-08/2000
  • Natural Sciences & Engineering Research Council Post Graduate Scholarships, University of Western Ontario, 09/1998-08/2000
  • University of Western Ontario Special University Scholarship, University of Western Ontario, 09/1997-08/2000
  • University of Waterloo Graduate Scholarship, University of Waterloo, 09/1996
  • Psychology Student Leadership Award, University of Waterloo, 04/1993
  • Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada Undergraduate Research Award
  • University of Waterloo, 09/1992, Science Incentive Program Research Scholarship, University of Waterloo, 06/1991
  • Engineering Society President’s Award, University of Waterloo, 04/1989

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Shanthi Srinivas, MD

Hematologist/Oncologist,
Medical Service

Academic Title and School Affiliation:

Assistant Professor, Rutgers University – New Jersey Medical School, Department of Medicine

Education:

M.D.

Areas of Research Interest:

  • Phase I, II, III Trials Multiple Myeloma
  • Lymphoid malignancies and Hematological Malignancies
  • Benign Hematological disorders
  • Co-morbidities

Memberships:

  • ECOG-ACRIN Lymphoma – Leukemia committee
  • Myeloma committee
  • American Medical Association
  • American Society of Hematology
  • American Society of Clinical Oncology

Awards and Recognitions:

Team Member for Award of excellence in Clinical Trials awarded by National Cancer Institute

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Chin-Lin Tseng, DrPH

Health Research Scientist, Biostatistician
Research Service

Education:

  • Columbia University, School of Public Health, Biostatistics and Sociomedical Sciences, Ph.D., New York, New York
  • National Taiwan University, Public Health, B.S., Taiwan, Taipei City
  • National Taiwan University, Health Policy and Management, M.S., Taiwan, Taipei City

Areas of Research Interest:

  • Quantitative Data Analysis
  • Health care access, utilization, outcome, disparities
  • Risk adjustment
  • Complex Chronic Disease (Diabetes, Chronic Kidney Disease, Multiple Sclerosis / Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis/ Spinal Cord Injury/Disorder)
  • Mental health
  • Medically unexplained illnesses

Memberships:

  • Academy Health
  • American Statistical Association
  • American Public Health Association
  • American Diabetes Association

Select Publications (2014-2018):

  1. Tseng CL, Soroka O, Maney M, Aron DC, Pogach LM. Assessing Potential Glycemic Overtreatment in Persons at Hypoglycemic Risk. JAMA Intern Med. 2014;174(2):259-268.
  2. Tseng CL, Soroka O, Pogach LM. Serious Hypoglycemia and Hyperglycemia Events in the Veterans Health Administration (VHA) in 2000-2007. Diabetes 63:A46-A46, May 2014.
  3. Aron DC1, Lowery J, Tseng CL, Conlin P, Kahwati L. De-implementation of inappropriately tight control (of hypoglycemia) for health: protocol with an example of a research grant application. Implement Sci. 2014 May 19;9:58
  4. Franklin H, Rajan M, Tseng CL, Pogach L, Sinha A, Mph M. Cost of lower-limb amputation in U.S. veterans with diabetes using health services data in fiscal years 2004 and 2010. Cost of lower-limb amputation in U.S. veterans with diabetes using health services data in fiscal years 2004 and 2010. J Rehabil Res Dev. 2014;51(8):1325-30.
  5. Tseng, CL, Lafrance J-P, Lu S-E, Soroka O, Miller DR, Maney M, Pogach L. Variability in estimated glomerular filtration rate values is a risk factor in chronic kidney disease progression among patients with diabetes. BMC Nephrol, Mar 25;16:34, 2015.
  6. Kirsh S, Carey E, Aron DC, Cardenas O, Graham G, Jain R, Au DH, Tseng CL, Franklin H, Ho PM. Impact of a national specialty e-consultation implementation project on access. Am J Manag Care. 2015 Dec 1;21(12):e648-54.
  7. Pogach LM, Tseng CL, Maney M, Soroka O, Aron DC. A Proposal for an Out-of-Range Glycemic Population Health Safety Measure for Older Adults With Diabetes. Diabetes Care Publish Ahead of Print, published online November 15, 2016
  8. Jani N, Falvo MJ, Sotolongo A, Osinubi OY, Tseng CL, Rowneki M, Montopoli M, Morley SW, Mitchell V, Helmer DA. Blast Injury and Cardiopulmonary Symptoms in U.S. Veterans: Analysis of a National Registry. Ann Intern Med. 2017 Sep 19.
  9. Wilson B, Tseng CL, Soroka O, Pogach LM, Aron DC. Identification of Outliers and Positive Deviants for Healthcare Improvement: Looking for High Performers in Hypoglycemia Safety in Patients with Diabetes. BMC Health Serv Res. 2017 Nov 16;17(1):738.
  10. Jani N, Falvo MJ, Sotolongo A, Osinubi OY, Tseng CL, Rowneki M, Montopoli M, Morley SW, Mitchell V, Helmer DA. Blast Injury and Cardiopulmonary Symptoms in U.S. Veterans: Analysis of a National Registry. Ann Intern Med. 2017 Nov 21;167(10):753-755.
  11. Helmer DA, Rowneki M, Feng X, Tseng CL, Rose D, Soroka O, Fried D, Jani N, Pogach LM, Sambamoorthi U. State-Level Variability in Veteran Reliance on Veterans Health Administration and Potentially Preventable Hospitalizations: A Geospatial Analysis. Inquiry. 2018 Jan-Dec;55:46958018756216.
  12. Fox A, Helmer D, Tseng CL, Patrick-DeLuca L, Osinubi O. Report of Autonomic Symptoms in a Clinical Sample of Veterans with Gulf War Illness. Mil Med. 2018 Mar 1;183(3-4):e179-e185.
  13. Fried DA, Rajan M, Tseng CL, Helmer D. Impact of presumed service-connected diagnosis on the Department of Veterans Affairs healthcare utilization patterns of Vietnam-Theater Veterans: A cross-sectional study. Medicine (Baltimore). 2018 May;97(19):e0662.
  14. Tseng CL, Soroka O, Pogach LM. An expanded prevention quality diabetes composite: Quantifying the burden of preventable hospitalizations for older adults with diabetes. J Diabetes Complications. 2018 May;32(5):458-464.
  15. Aron DC, Tseng CL, Soroka O, Pogach LM. Balancing measures: identifying unintended consequences of diabetes quality performance measures in patients at high risk for hypoglycemia. Int J Qual Health Care. 2018 Jul 20.
  16. Fox, A., Helmer, D., Tseng, C., McCarron, K., Satcher, S., Osinubi, O. Autonomic symptoms in Gulf War Veterans evaluated at the War Related Illness and Injury Study Center. Mil Med. 2018 Sep 12.
  17. Fox, A., Riska, K., Tseng, C., McCarron, K., Satcher, S., Osinubi, O., Helmer, D. Dizziness, Vertigo, and Mental Health Comorbidity in Gulf War Veterans. Journal of the American Academy of Audiology. (in press)

Awards and Recognitions:

  • Travel award, Meharry-Vanderbilt Alliance Annual National Health Disparities Conference, Nashville, Tennessee, (2007)
  • Excellent Research Work Prize for master thesis, Department of Education, Taiwan, (1992)

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glenn_wylieGlenn R. Wylie, DPhil

Acting Associate Director of Research / War Related Illness & Injury Study Center

Academic Title and School Affiliation:

Associate Research Professor, Rutgers University Medical School

Education:

DPhil

Areas of Research Interest:

  • Cognitive control
  • Physical and mental fatigue
  • Neuroimaging of rehabilitation interventions

Memberships:

  • The Cognitive Neuroscience Society
  • The Society for Neuroscience
  • The Organization for Human Brain Mapping
  • The International Neuropsychology Society
  • The Association for Psychological Science
  • The American Psychological Association

Select Publications:

  1. Akbar, N., Sandroff, B., Wylie, G.R., Strober, L.B., Smith, A., Goverover, Y., Motl, R.W., DeLuca, J., & Genova, H. (2018). Progressive resistance exercise training and changes in resting-state functional connectivity of the caudate in persons with multiple sclerosis and severe fatigue: A proof-of-concept study. Neuropsychological Rehabilitation. [ePub ahead of print].
  2. Sandroff BM, Wylie GR, Sutton BP, Johnson CL, DeLuca J, Motl RW. (2018). Treadmill walking exercise training and brain function in multiple sclerosis: preliminary evidence setting the stage for a network-based approach to rehabilitation. Mult Scler: Exp Trans Clin. 4(1): 2055217318760641
  3. Rajagopalan V, Das A, Zhang L, Hillary F, Wylie GR, Yue GH. (2018) Fractal dimension brain morphometry: a novel approach to quantify white matter in traumatic brain injury. Brain Imaging Behav. doi: 10.1007/s11682-018-9892-2. [Epub ahead of print] PubMed PMID: 29909586.
  4. van Geest Q, Douw L, van ‘t Klooster S, Leurs CE, Genova HM, Wylie GR, Steenwijk MD, Killestein J, Geurts JJG, Hulst HE. (2018) Information processing speed in multiple sclerosis: Relevance of default mode network dynamics. Neuroimage Clin.;19:507-515. doi: 10.1016/j.nicl.2018.05.015. eCollection 2018. PubMed PMID: 29984159; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC6030565.
  5. Wecht JM, Weir JP, Katzelnick CG, Wylie G, Eraifej M, Nguyen N, Dyson-Hudson T, Bauman WA, Chiaravalloti N. (2018). Systemic and Cerebral Hemodynamic Contribution to Cognitive Performance in Spinal Cord Injury. J Neurotrauma. doi: 10.1089/neu.2018.5760. [Epub ahead of print] PubMed PMID: 30113243.
  6. Wylie, G.R. & Flashman, L. (2017). Understanding the interplay between mild traumatic brain injury and cognitive fatigue: models and treatments. Concussion. 2(4).
  7. Wylie, G.R., Dobryakova, E.,DeLuca, J., Chiaravalloti, N., Essad, K., & Genova, H. (2017). Cognitive fatigue in individuals with traumatic brain injury is associated with reduced activation of the caudate body. Scientific Reports. 7(1): 8973.
  8. Dobryakova, E.M., Hulst, H., Chiaravalloti, N., Genova, H.M., Wylie, G.R., & DeLuca. J. (2017). Frontal-striatal network activation leads to less fatigue in multiple sclerosis. Multiple Sclerosis Journal. [ePub ahead of print]
  9. Wylie, G.R., Genova, H.M., DeLuca, J. & Dobryakova, E. (2017). The relationship between outcome prediction and cognitive fatigue: a convergence of paradigms. Journal of Cognitive, Affective & Behavioral Neuroscience. 17(4):838-49.

Awards and Recognitions:

  • 2012: Kessler Foundation Research Center Outstanding performance award; Best Platform Presentation (Annual Consortium of Multiple Sclerosis Centers [CMSC])
  • 2010: National Yang-Ming University (Taipei, Taiwan) International Collaboration Grant, Kessler Foundation Research Center SPOT award
  • 2009: Kessler Foundation Research Center Outstanding performance award
  • 2008: Kessler Medical Rehabilitation Research and Education Center Outstanding performance award
  • 2006, 2007: Kessler Medical Rehabilitation Research and Education Corporation Outstanding performance award
  • 1995-1999: McDonnell-Pew post-graduate grant
  • 1995-1998: Overseas research studentship

Fengming Zhong, MD, PhD

Hematologist/Oncologist,
Medical Service

Academic Title and School Affiliation:

Assistant Professor of Medicine, Rutgers University, New Jersey Medical School

Education:

  • Cornell University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Molecular Biology, PhD, New York, New York
  • Zhejiang University Medical College, Hangzhou, Zhejiang, P.R. China, MD

Areas of Research Interest:

Clinical research involving phase II and III ECOG and pharmaceutical clinical trials (gastrointestinal cancer, hepatocellular Carcinoma, pancreatic cancer, prostate cancer, lung cancer, head and neck cancer, and etc)

Memberships:

  • American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO)
  • Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG)
  • VISN 3 hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) team

Awards and Recognitions:

Clinical Research of Excellence by the National Cancer Institute

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Mark Zimering, MD, PhD

mark_zimering

Chief, Endocrine and Diabetes Section,
Medical Service

Academic Title and School Affiliation:

Associate Professor of Medicine, Co-Terminous, Rutgers University – Robert Wood Johnson Medical School

Education:

  • Harvard College, (1977)
  • Albert Einstein College of Medicine, (1983)

Areas of Research Interest:

  • Fibroblast Growth Factors
  • Diabetes Mellitus
  • Vascular Complications
  • Neurodegenerative disorders
  • Autoimmunity

Memberships:

  • Endocrine Society
  • American Diabetes Association

Select Publications:

  1. Zimering MB. Circulating Neurotoxic 5-HT2A Receptor Agonist Autoantibodies in Adult Type 2 Diabetes with Parkinson’s Disease. J Endocrinol Diabetes. 2018;5(2). doi: 10.15226/2374-6890/5/2/01102
  2. Zimering MB. Diabetes Autoantibodies Mediate Neural- and Endothelial Cell- Inhibitory Effects Via 5-Hydroxytryptamine- 2 Receptor Coupled to Phospholipase C/Inositol Triphosphate/Ca2+ Pathway. J Endocrinol Diabetes. 2017;4(4). doi: 10.15226/2374-6890/4/4/00184.
  3. Zimering MB, Knight J, Ge L, Bahn G; VADT Investigators. Predictors of Cognitive Decline in Older Adult Type 2 Diabetes from the Veterans Affairs Diabetes Trial. Front Endocrinol (Lausanne). 2016; 7:123. doi: 10.3389/fendo.2016.00123
  4. Zimering MB, Behnke JA, Thakker-Varia S, Alder J. Autoantibodies in Human Diabetic Depression Inhibit Adult Neural Progenitor Cells In vitro and Induce Depressive-Like Behavior in Rodents. J Endocrinol Diabetes. 2015;2(2). doi: 10.15226/2374-6890/2/2/00119.
  5. Zimering MB, Zhang JH, Guarino PD, Emanuele N, McCullough PA, Fried LF; Investigators for the VA NEPHRON-D. Endothelial cell autoantibodies in predicting declining renal function, end-stage renal disease, or death in adult type 2 diabetic nephropathy. Front Endocrinol (Lausanne). 2014; 5:128. doi: 10.3389/fendo.2014.00128
  6. Zimering MB, Moritz TE, Donnelly RJ. Anti-neurotrophic effects from autoantibodies in adult diabetes having primary open angle glaucoma or dementia. Front Endocrinol (Lausanne). 2013; 4:58. doi: 10.3389/fendo.2013.00058
  7. Zimering MB, Anderson RJ, Ge L, Moritz TE, Duckworth WC; Investigators for the VADT. Basic fibroblast growth factor predicts cardiovascular disease occurrence in participants from the veterans affairs diabetes trial. Front Endocrinol (Lausanne). 2013;4:183. doi: 10.3389/fendo.2013.00183.
  8. Zimering MB, Alder J, Pan Z, Donnelly RJ. Anti-endothelial and anti-neuronal effects from auto-antibodies in subsets of adult diabetes having a cluster of microvascular complications. Diabetes Res Clin Pract. 2011 Jul;93(1):95-105.
  9. Zimering MB. Recurrent macular edema and stroke syndrome in Type 1 diabetes with potent endothelial cell inhibitory autoantibodies. Endocr Pract. 2010; 16(5): 842-850.
  10. Zimering MB, Anderson RJ, Moritz TE, Ge L; Investigators for the VADT. Endothelial cell inhibitory autoantibodies are associated with laser photocoagulation in adults from the Veterans Affairs Diabetes Trial. Metabolism. 2009;58(6):882-7.
  11. Zimering MB, Anderson RJ, Moritz TE, Ge L; Investigators for the VADT. Low plasma basic fibroblast growth factor is associated with laser photocoagulation treatment in adult type 2 diabetes mellitus from the Veterans Affairs Diabetes Trial. Metabolism. 2009;58(3):393-400.
  12. Zimering MB, Pan Z. Autoantibodies in type 2 diabetes induce stress fiber formation and apoptosis in endothelial cells. J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2009;94(6):2171-7.

Awards and Recognitions:

  • Arthur S. Flemming Award, (2003)
  • Inventor, US Patent Number 7,972,798

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